5 Ways To Make Bacon Part Of Your Wedding Day

December 30th is National Bacon Day. In honor of this special day I present five ways ways to include this tasty meat in your wedding day: from procession to reception.

1. Bacon Bouquet. Want something different from the traditional wedding flowers? How about walking down the aisle clutching a bouquet of bacon roses.

Photo credit: Foodbeast

2. Bacon hor’doevres: offer your quests these petite hor’doevres to snack on while your wedding party is out taking wedding photos.

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3. Bacon with bourbon chasers: because nothing goes together like bacon and booze.

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4. Bacon Bar: Having a morning affair? How about pairing a bacon bar with an omelet bar and waffle station?

Photo credit: Sweet Rhodes Photography

5. Bacon Wedding Cake And finally, the piece dela resistance! The bacon infused and decoraed wedding cake.

Photo credit Daniel Taylor Photography

Happy National Fruitcake Day

Photo credit: http://www.Odlums.ie

You may know that December 27th is National Fruitcake Day. You may know that fruitcake is traditionally served at British royal weddings. But did you know that the original wedding cake is fruitcake? It’s true, and for two reasons.

Firstly, fruitcake was once viewed as a symbol of wealth and prosperity due to its expensive and sought after ingredients , ie sugar, spices and exotic fruits. Therefore serving it was a show of financial status.

The second reason has to do with the fact that the tradition started in the Middle Ages, when food preservation was a problem. The high content of rum or brandy in fruitcake protects the cake from spoilage. The fruit in a fruitcake is also functional; it serves to attract water molecules that keep the cake moist. Add the fruit and alcohol together and you get a moist cake that just won’t (or can’t) go bad.

The virtual inability of fruitcake to go bad is a huge benefit to royal wedding cake bakers who sometimes require several months to decorate royal wedding cakes.

Queen Elizabeth II’s wedding cake in 1947 photo credit: Getty images

Alexis & DeAngelo at Little Corona Del Mar Beach

Who says that you can’t dress up for your beach elopement. Definitely not Alexis and DeAngelo who came to slay at their beach elopement on Little Corona Del Mar Beach in Corona Del.Mar.

The date 11/11 holds not only spiritual but personal significance for Alexis and DeAngelo, therefore it was important for them to be married on that day. They originally planned to elope on El Matador in Malibu. However when the Woolsey wildfire made the Malibu area inaccessible, I was able to suggest Little Corona Del Mar Beach. So not only were they able to marry on 11/11 in the presence of Mother Ocean, but they both said that this setting was even more beautiful than their original choice.

The ceremony, which was attended by both mothers and the groom’s sister, included words on the significance of numerical sequence 1111 and jumping the broom.

Photographer: Kelley : Kelli Scates

Officiant: Rev. Connie Jones-Steward

Ife & John at Hummingbird Nest Ranch

On a sunny afternoon in September Ife and John said “I do” in a lovely ceremony at The Hummingbird Nest Ranch in Simi Valley, CA.

The groom wore a pink tux in honor of his mother who died of breast cancer. Their customized ceremony included personal vows written by the couple, poetry by Gibran and culminated in Ife and John jumping the broom.

John is author of the book “The Oop: Simplifying Finance & Economics Through Basketball”, in which the concepts and terminology of basketball are used to impart financial wisdom and literacy. His writing skill was evident in his touching and personal vows to Ife.

Photography: Hannah Costello

Venue: Hummingbird Nest Ranch

Planner: Champion Events Productions

Cake: Frost It Cakery

Floral: Fox Gloves & Folly

Officiant: Rev. Connie Jones-Steward of Officiant Lady.

Elope on Ferndell Hiking Trail

Bridges and grottos and trails OH MY! Ferndell Hiking Trail in the Ferndell section of Los Angeles’s Griffith Park is the perfect spot for a woodsy elopement . However, you’ll have to have your elopement ceremony early if you want to find nearby parking spot and avoid being photobombed by hikers.

Keep scrolling to see the hollow tree that looks like a heart.

Visit my website at http://www.officiantlady. com to learn more about my elopement services.

Elope on Ferndell Hiking Trail

Places to elope in Los Angeles

Elope in Los Angeles

Elope at Compton Creek Natural Park

Bridge at Compton Creek Natural Park

Would you like to elope near a creek, bike path and hiking trails without having to drive to Griffith Park?

Compton Creek Natural Park in Compton, CA is an oasis of natural beauty and serenity located in the heart of the Hub City. The native plants and tranquil surroundings will provide a picturesque backdrop for your elopement photos.

Compton Creek Natural Park

Compton Creek Natural Park

Visit my website @ http://www.officiantlady.com to learn about my elopement services.

The Persian Sugar Rubbing Ritual

Persian Sugar Rubbing Ceremony
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There are several beautiful and meaningful rituals that take place during a Persian wedding ceremony, but none is sweeter than the sugar rubbing ritual that involves several well-wishing women spreading sweetness in the couple’s life and marriage.

During the sugar rubbing ritual, the couple will be seated, and women i women hold the opposite sides of the cloth, and at times, four women can hold each corner of the cloth. Other ladies will come up, and take turns rubbing together large cones made of hard sugar, to sprinkle sweetness onto the cloth held overhead. Another interpretation of this custom is that each sugar cone represents the bride and the groom and this act is in the hopes that every contact between them will result in sweetness

There are differing beliefs about who should rub the sugar cones over the couple. Some believe that the ladies who are rubbing the sugar must be “happily married” so that their happiness and success rubs off on the couple. However, with the rise of multi-cultural and interfaith marriages, this ritual has adapted to embrace the varying demographics of the guests.

During many ceremonies, the bridesmaids are the ones to hold the Unity Cloth, which makes for a uniform and color coordinated effect. And as for who does the sugar rubbing, many families are open to having any woman who so wishes, to come up and take part in this beautiful ritual. In my own opinion and as an interfaith wedding officiant this is my personal choice. I also believe that granulated sugar can be sprinkled in lieu of the rubbing of the sugar cones

To incorporate this or another unity ritual into your wedding ceremony, contact Rev. Connie Jones Steward, www.officiantlady.com